Mark Doyle recently had his article BIM and the Future of Structural Engineering Practice published in The Structural Engineer November 2013.
Follow the link to download the full article:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/107041152/ISE%20Viewpoint%20Nov%2013.pdf

Mark Doyle recently had his article BIM and the Future of Structural Engineering Practice published in The Structural Engineer November 2013.

Follow the link to download the full article:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/107041152/ISE%20Viewpoint%20Nov%2013.pdf

Housing – A Critical Perspective   
Interdisciplinary Conference Call
08-09 April 2015
The provision of adequate housing is one of the major political issues in the UK today. Against a background of disparate policy interventions, resistances, contradictions and conflict, the Housing - Critical Futures UK Conference seeks to bring together architects, planners, sociologists, artists, economists, geographers, political activists, housing associations and policy makers with the aim of creating a space in which to debate this urgent issue. The themes for this conference are deliberately open. Reflecting the belief that housing and its social implications are not discipline-specific concerns the conference invites cross-disciplinary, creative, and critical thinking. 
The questions we are asking are multiple: How are elite, privatised residential developments reshaping urban space? How have recent policy interventions impacted on the social lives of neighbourhoods? What are some of the ways in which architects have responded to affordable housing crises? What insights can politically-engaged art projects bring to bear in this context? How have sociological studies sought to make sense of the local contexts into which wider structural issues are inflected? What role will states have in the housing solutions of the future? How can architects work with existing building stock to help sustain communities under threat? How have local activists ensured their voice is heard in the context of gentrifiying cities? What role is there for critical planning theory vis-à-vis housing? 
We are keen to encourage reflection and discussion from across different disciplinary perspectives, and to encourage participation from those engaging in research and activism from both inside and outside academia.    
A range of options are available to those wishing to present. We welcome submissions for Conference Presentations (20 minutes); Full Written Papers (3,000 words); and a range of alternative proposals, such as 5 minute Pecha Kucha talks; short film screenings; photographic essays; installations etc. You are invited to propose other options. 
Key Dates:       
12 December 2014: Abstract Submissions
20 December 2014: Abstract Feedback
20 March 2015: Full Paper Submissions (where applicable)
01 April 2015:  Registration deadline
08-09 April. Conference
01 May 2015: Feedback for publication
01 July 2015: Publication of Full papers
This event is organised by the interdisciplinary journal Architecture, Media, Politics, Society; the sociology department of Liverpool University; and the Architecture Department of Liverpool John Moores University. It forms As part of a major international program of events Housing – Critical Futures.

For more details. Visit: http://architecturemps.com/housing-critical-perspective/

Housing – A Critical Perspective  

Interdisciplinary Conference Call

08-09 April 2015

The provision of adequate housing is one of the major political issues in the UK today. Against a background of disparate policy interventions, resistances, contradictions and conflict, the Housing - Critical Futures UK Conference seeks to bring together architects, planners, sociologists, artists, economists, geographers, political activists, housing associations and policy makers with the aim of creating a space in which to debate this urgent issue. The themes for this conference are deliberately open. Reflecting the belief that housing and its social implications are not discipline-specific concerns the conference invites cross-disciplinary, creative, and critical thinking.

The questions we are asking are multiple: How are elite, privatised residential developments reshaping urban space? How have recent policy interventions impacted on the social lives of neighbourhoods? What are some of the ways in which architects have responded to affordable housing crises? What insights can politically-engaged art projects bring to bear in this context? How have sociological studies sought to make sense of the local contexts into which wider structural issues are inflected? What role will states have in the housing solutions of the future? How can architects work with existing building stock to help sustain communities under threat? How have local activists ensured their voice is heard in the context of gentrifiying cities? What role is there for critical planning theory vis-à-vis housing?

We are keen to encourage reflection and discussion from across different disciplinary perspectives, and to encourage participation from those engaging in research and activism from both inside and outside academia.   

A range of options are available to those wishing to present. We welcome submissions for Conference Presentations (20 minutes); Full Written Papers (3,000 words); and a range of alternative proposals, such as 5 minute Pecha Kucha talks; short film screenings; photographic essays; installations etc. You are invited to propose other options. 

Key Dates:      

12 December 2014: Abstract Submissions

20 December 2014: Abstract Feedback

20 March 2015: Full Paper Submissions (where applicable)

01 April 2015:  Registration deadline

08-09 April. Conference

01 May 2015: Feedback for publication

01 July 2015: Publication of Full papers

This event is organised by the interdisciplinary journal Architecture, Media, Politics, Society; the sociology department of Liverpool University; and the Architecture Department of Liverpool John Moores University. It forms As part of a major international program of events Housing – Critical Futures.

For more details. Visit: http://architecturemps.com/housing-critical-perspective/

Tags: Conference

Dr Robert MacDonald’s research paper The City as a Laboratory of Shadow: Exposing Secret Histories While Thinking of the Future  was recently published in the online journal Architecture_Media_Politics_Society vol.4, no.1.  Follow the link below to access the paper.
http://architecturemps.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/amps-vol-4-no-1-full-paper-the-city-as-a-laboratory-of-shadows_exposing-secret-histories-while-thinking-of-the-future1.pdf

Dr Robert MacDonald’s research paper The City as a Laboratory of Shadow: Exposing Secret Histories While Thinking of the Future  was recently published in the online journal Architecture_Media_Politics_Society vol.4, no.1.  Follow the link below to access the paper.

http://architecturemps.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/amps-vol-4-no-1-full-paper-the-city-as-a-laboratory-of-shadows_exposing-secret-histories-while-thinking-of-the-future1.pdf

A research paper by Dr Charlie Smith has recently been published in the journal New Library World.  Titled ‘Future of the book and library creatively explored’, the paper incorporated Comprehensive Design Project work by Level 6 students.  It discussed library design and the future of physical books in an increasingly digital world, in the context of the students’ design projects and contemporary research on the subject.  Despite being designed by digitally-literate students, physical books were highly significant in each project; however the cultural significance of the books often took precedence over the objects themselves.  The role of the library in the public realm was also extensively explored.
Established in 1898, New Library World is one of the oldest library journals in the world, and is downloaded in more than 110 countries and with an average of 3000 downloads per month.
The abstract and the full paper are available at:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0307-4803&volume=115&issue=5&PHPSESSID=mookgnp96lv6u6jn9rh3mabb77

A research paper by Dr Charlie Smith has recently been published in the journal New Library World.  Titled ‘Future of the book and library creatively explored’, the paper incorporated Comprehensive Design Project work by Level 6 students.  It discussed library design and the future of physical books in an increasingly digital world, in the context of the students’ design projects and contemporary research on the subject.  Despite being designed by digitally-literate students, physical books were highly significant in each project; however the cultural significance of the books often took precedence over the objects themselves.  The role of the library in the public realm was also extensively explored.

Established in 1898, New Library World is one of the oldest library journals in the world, and is downloaded in more than 110 countries and with an average of 3000 downloads per month.

The abstract and the full paper are available at:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0307-4803&volume=115&issue=5&PHPSESSID=mookgnp96lv6u6jn9rh3mabb77

Charlie Smith recently presented a research paper titled “The student-directed learning landscape - Academia without academics?” at the 10th Higher Education Academy Annual Conference, which took place on 2 and 3 July at Aston University.  The theme of this conference was ‘preparing for learning futures: the next ten years’.  It focused on the future of the student learning experience, and explored how educators are preparing for it, and asked what the next ten years will hold, what will change, what needs to change, and how best to prepare for that change.  The conference attracted an international field of 500 delegates.
Charlie’s abstract read:
“Higher education students are creating their own learning experiences through pedagogic methods in which they are charged with responsibility for their own learning.  There is increasing adoption of learning and teaching methods that – rightly – nurture independence in students, such as self-directed learning and the development of self-critical analysis.  Such approaches are frequently cited as evolving skills that are demanded in the workplace, thus increasing graduates’ potential employability.  The adoption of such methods is transforming students’ learning and teaching experience in higher education, and empowering them to define their own learning trajectory.  Do such emerging trends mean that the role of the academic is becoming ‘facilitator’ as opposed to ‘teacher’?
This session will outline the conclusions of two research projects that studied student-directed learning methods.  Whilst these two projects constitute different pedagogic approaches, a common theme to both is the orientation of the initiative for learning toward the student.  Whilst both research projects are within a particular subject area – architecture – they create cross-disciplinary conclusions.  These conclusions are brought together collectively within the presentation, and become discussion points about student-directed learning.  The increasing occupation of virtual, as opposed to real, learning environments will also be referenced in the context of self-directed learning.
These different strands are woven together in a presentation that is as much provocative as it is conclusive, but which questions the implications of students’ increasing responsibility for their own learning.  It asks how are these pedagogic innovations changing the landscape of higher education?  In particular, it questions what the role of the academic will become in this new landscape of student-directed learning. The session will discuss teaching practices that are transforming student learning, and changing the higher education experience.  Whilst these approaches have the capacity to empower students in shaping their own learning, they also have implications in how students adapt to the transition from teacher-led to student-led learning, in supportive and inclusive ways.”

Charlie Smith recently presented a research paper titled “The student-directed learning landscape - Academia without academics?” at the 10th Higher Education Academy Annual Conference, which took place on 2 and 3 July at Aston University.  The theme of this conference was ‘preparing for learning futures: the next ten years’.  It focused on the future of the student learning experience, and explored how educators are preparing for it, and asked what the next ten years will hold, what will change, what needs to change, and how best to prepare for that change.  The conference attracted an international field of 500 delegates.

Charlie’s abstract read:

“Higher education students are creating their own learning experiences through pedagogic methods in which they are charged with responsibility for their own learning.  There is increasing adoption of learning and teaching methods that – rightly – nurture independence in students, such as self-directed learning and the development of self-critical analysis.  Such approaches are frequently cited as evolving skills that are demanded in the workplace, thus increasing graduates’ potential employability.  The adoption of such methods is transforming students’ learning and teaching experience in higher education, and empowering them to define their own learning trajectory.  Do such emerging trends mean that the role of the academic is becoming ‘facilitator’ as opposed to ‘teacher’?

This session will outline the conclusions of two research projects that studied student-directed learning methods.  Whilst these two projects constitute different pedagogic approaches, a common theme to both is the orientation of the initiative for learning toward the student.  Whilst both research projects are within a particular subject area – architecture – they create cross-disciplinary conclusions.  These conclusions are brought together collectively within the presentation, and become discussion points about student-directed learning.  The increasing occupation of virtual, as opposed to real, learning environments will also be referenced in the context of self-directed learning.

These different strands are woven together in a presentation that is as much provocative as it is conclusive, but which questions the implications of students’ increasing responsibility for their own learning.  It asks how are these pedagogic innovations changing the landscape of higher education?  In particular, it questions what the role of the academic will become in this new landscape of student-directed learning. The session will discuss teaching practices that are transforming student learning, and changing the higher education experience.  Whilst these approaches have the capacity to empower students in shaping their own learning, they also have implications in how students adapt to the transition from teacher-led to student-led learning, in supportive and inclusive ways.”

LJMU Staff and PG graduates presented their shortlisted Living Cities Challenge proposals at the UK Trade and Industries conference yesterday. This major event at the International Festival of Business in Liverpool linked architectural practices and educators together from Liverpool, Bristol and Chicago to explore urban regeneration ideas in their respective cities.
Congratulations to Philip Lo, Dominic Wilkinson and Robert MacDonald, Anthony Malone, Suzanne Bowman, Philip Dudley and Jakub Rozanski.

BA Show Catalogue now avalable:
http://issuu.com/architecture-ljmu/docs/ba_show_catalogue_2014

Tags: exhibition

Our Architecture degree show opens this evening, 5pm till late, great work on display this year, all welcome.

Our Architecture degree show opens this evening, 5pm till late, great work on display this year, all welcome.

ArchSoc FilmWorks - Jiro Dreams of Sushi
Friday 11 April @ 4pm
JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

ArchSoc FilmWorks - Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Friday 11 April @ 4pm

JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

ShedKM - HOMEWORK 
ArchSoc Guest Lecture
Tuesday, 1st April, 13:00 - 14:00
Lecture Room 1, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry
Biography - http://www.shedkm.co.uk/about/

ShedKM - HOMEWORK 

ArchSoc Guest Lecture

Tuesday, 1st April, 13:00 - 14:00

Lecture Room 1, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

Biography - http://www.shedkm.co.uk/about/

ArchSoc FilmWorks - The Road
Friday 28 March @ 4pm
JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

ArchSoc FilmWorks - The Road

Friday 28 March @ 4pm

JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

Space CaviarDEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture SeriesThursday 27 March 18:15pm - 19:30pmLecture Room 1, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry
Biography - http://www.spacecaviar.net/about/

Space Caviar
DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series
Thursday 27 March 18:15pm - 19:30pm
Lecture Room 1, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

Biography - http://www.spacecaviar.net/about/

Studio Folder
DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series
Monday 24 March 18:00pm - 19:00pm
JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry
Taste - https://www.domusweb.it/en/interviews/2012/02/20/the-importance-of-being-axonometric.html

Studio Folder

DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series

Monday 24 March 18:00pm - 19:00pm

JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

Taste - https://www.domusweb.it/en/interviews/2012/02/20/the-importance-of-being-axonometric.html

David Adjaye
DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series
Biography - http://www.adjaye.com/about/profile/
Friday 21 March 18:15pm - 20:00pm
JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry
Booking Required: archsocljmu.gmail.com

David Adjaye

DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series

Biography - http://www.adjaye.com/about/profile/

Friday 21 March 18:15pm - 20:00pm

JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

Booking Required: archsocljmu.gmail.com

Yaniv Peer
DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series
Biography - http://www.exploration-architecture.com/section.php?xSec=53
Friday 14 March 5:00pm - 6:00pm
JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry

Yaniv Peer

DEVIATIONS - ArchSoc Lecture Series

Biography - http://www.exploration-architecture.com/section.php?xSec=53

Friday 14 March 5:00pm - 6:00pm

JF Auditorium, JL Art & Design Building - Free Entry